Počet záznamů: 1  

Some remarks on the transitional phase between Early Roman and Late Roman Periods in the region north of the Middle Danube

  1. 1.
    0453463 - ARUB-Q 2016 RIV CZ eng J - Článek v odborném periodiku
    Tejral, Jaroslav
    Some remarks on the transitional phase between Early Roman and Late Roman Periods in the region north of the Middle Danube.
    Přehled výzkumů. Roč. 56, č. 2 (2015), s. 43-101. ISSN 1211-7250
    Institucionální podpora: RVO:68081758
    Klíčová slova: Early and Late Roman Period * transitional phase * Marcomanic Wars and their aftermath * ethnical and social backround of the B2/C1 phase
    Kód oboru RIV: AC - Archeologie, antropologie, etnologie
    http://prehled-vyzkumu.arub.avcr.cz/miranda2/export/sitesavcr/arub-prehled-vyzkumu/prehled-cisel-a-clanku/prehled-vydanych-cisel/files/PV56_2_Studie2_Tejral.pdf

    This paper deals with the so-called transitional phase B2/C1, the nature of which is still being debated in the archaeological literature. The heart of the discussion is in its archaeological relevance, the dating, and its cultural, ethnic and social background. The general consensus is that it dates to the time of Marcomannic wars. On the basis of new archaeological evidence and an analysis of some diagnostic forms found on the datable sites north of the Danube, it is suggested that the Late Roman phase C1a overlaps to a large extent with the so-called transitional B2/C1 phase, which began shortly before AD 180. A question arises of how to define the subsequent phase C1a and whether both phases in question can be seen as separate stages with separate chronological sequences. Controversy surrounds the proposed detailed division of the transitional phase between Early and Late Roman Periods into two phases and therewith also a sharp chronological differentiation of the archaeological material from the late 2nd century and approximatively the first third of the 3rd century. The emergence of a specific archaeological milieu relating to the transitional phase probably has an ethnic and socio-cultural background. It shows strong influences from the Roman provinces. Its characteristic features may be considered as a reflection of wars and their aftermath.
    Trvalý link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0254287