Počet záznamů: 1

Human activities predominate in determining changing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis in Europe

  1. 1.
    0352770 - UBO-W 2011 RIV FR eng J - Článek v odborném periodiku
    Randolph, S. E. - Anda, P. - Avsic-Zupanc, T. - Bormane, A. - Egyed, L. - Ferenczi, E. - García-Pérez, A. L. - Gern, L. - Hubálek, Zdeněk - Kazimírová, M. - Kondrusik, M. - Pfister, K. - Rizzoli, A. - Vasilenko, V. - Vladimirescu, A. - Žygutiene, M.
    Human activities predominate in determining changing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis in Europe.
    Eurosurveillance. Roč. 15, č. 27 (2010), s. 24-31 ISSN 1560-7917
    Grant ostatní: 6th Framework Programme(XE) GOCE-2003-010284 EDEN
    Výzkumný záměr: CEZ:AV0Z60930519
    Klíčová slova: tick-borne encephalitis
    Kód oboru RIV: FN - Epidemiologie, infek. nemoci a klin. imunologie
    http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19606

    Explanations for the dynamics of tick-borne disease systems usually focus on changes in the transmission potential in natural enzootic cycles. These are undoubtedly important, but recent analyses reveal that variation in human activities that may impact inadvertently but positively on both the enzootic cycles and the degree of human exposure to those cycles, provide more robust explanations for recent upsurges in tick-borne encephalitis in Europe. This can account for long-term increases in incidence, for small-scales spatial variation in incidence within a country, and for short-scale fluctuations such as annual spikes in incidence. The patterns of relevant human activities, typically those related to the use of forest resources, are evidently driven and/or constrained by the cultural and socio-economic circumstances of each population, resulting in contrasting national epidemiological outcomes.
    Trvalý link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0192199