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Quasi-periodic patterns contribute to functional connectivity in the brain

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    SYSNO ASEP0545849
    Document TypeJ - Journal Article
    R&D Document TypeThe record was not marked in the RIV
    Subsidiary JČlánek ve WOS
    TitleQuasi-periodic patterns contribute to functional connectivity in the brain
    Author(s) Abbas, A. (US)
    Belloy, M.E. (BE)
    Kashyap, A. (US)
    Billings, Jacob (UIVT-O) SAI, ORCID, RID
    Nezafati, M. (US)
    Schumacher, E.H. (US)
    Keilholz, S. (US)
    Number of authors7
    Source TitleNeuroimage. - : Elsevier - ISSN 1053-8119
    Roč. 191 (2019), s. 193-204
    Languageeng - English
    CountryUS - United States
    Keywordsresting-state fmri ; default mode network ; slow eeg fluctuations ; spatiotemporal dynamics ; optimization ; registration ; organization ; modulation ; predict ; cortex ; Functional connectivity ; Resting state ; Task ; Quasi-periodic patterns ; Default mode network ; Task positive network
    UT WOS000462145700017
    EID SCOPUS85061817660
    DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.01.076
    AnnotationFunctional connectivity is widely used to study the coordination of activity between brain regions over time. Functional connectivity in the default mode and task positive networks is particularly important for normal brain function. However, the processes that give rise to functional connectivity in the brain are not fully understood. It has been postulated that low-frequency neural activity plays a key role in establishing the functional architecture of the brain. Quasi-periodic patterns (QPPs) are a reliably observable form of low-frequency neural activity that involve the default mode and task positive networks. Here, QPPs from resting-state and working memory taskperforming individuals were acquired. The spatiotemporal pattern, strength, and frequency of the QPPs between the two groups were compared and the contribution of QPPs to functional connectivity in the brain was measured. In task-performing individuals, the spatiotemporal pattern of the QPP changes, particularly in taskrelevant regions, and the QPP tends to occur with greater strength and frequency. Differences in the QPPs between the two groups could partially account for the variance in functional connectivity between resting-state and task-performing individuals. The QPPs contribute strongly to connectivity in the default mode and task positive networks and to the strength of anti-correlation seen between the two networks. Many of the connections affected by QPPs are also disrupted during several neurological disorders. These findings contribute to understanding the dynamic neural processes that give rise to functional connectivity in the brain and how they may be disrupted during disease.
    WorkplaceInstitute of Computer Science
    ContactTereza Šírová, sirova@cs.cas.cz, Tel.: 266 053 800
    Year of Publishing2022
Number of the records: 1