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Earthworms increase plant biomass more in soil with no earthworm legacy than in earthworm‐mediated soil, and favour late successional species in competition

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    SYSNO ASEP0489188
    Document TypeJ - Journal Article
    R&D Document TypeJournal Article
    Subsidiary JČlánek ve WOS
    TitleEarthworms increase plant biomass more in soil with no earthworm legacy than in earthworm‐mediated soil, and favour late successional species in competition
    Author(s) Mudrák, Ondřej (BU-J) RID
    Frouz, J. (CZ)
    Source TitleFunctional Ecology - ISSN 0269-8463
    Roč. 32, č. 3 (2018), s. 626-636
    Number of pages10 s.
    Languageeng - English
    CountryGB - United Kingdom
    Keywordssuccession ; earthworms ; restoration
    Subject RIVEH - Ecology, Behaviour
    OBOR OECDEcology
    R&D ProjectsGA17-09979S GA ČR - Czech Science Foundation (CSF)
    GA17-19376S GA ČR - Czech Science Foundation (CSF)
    GA13-10377S GA ČR - Czech Science Foundation (CSF)
    GA15-11635S GA ČR - Czech Science Foundation (CSF)
    Institutional supportBU-J - RVO:67985939
    UT WOS000426503900004
    EID SCOPUS85032937356
    DOI10.1111/1365-2435.12999
    AnnotationOur results indicate that the direct effects of earthworm presence on plants decrease during succession because of the cumulative effects of earthworm activity on soil conditions. Such ecosystem engineering effects favor late successional competitors and therefore promote the replacement of species during succession.
    WorkplaceInstitute of Botany
    ContactMartina Bartošová, martina.bartosova@ibot.cas.cz, ibot@ibot.cas.cz, Tel.: 271 015 242 ; Monika Sosnová, monika.sosnova@ibot.cas.cz ; Marie Kalátová, kalatova@butbn.cas.cz, Tel.: 384 721 156-8
    Year of Publishing2019
Number of the records: 1