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Effect of forest clearing on the abundance of Ixodes ricinus ticks and the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l

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    SYSNO ASEP0040718
    Document TypeJ - Journal Article
    R&D Document TypeJournal Article
    Subsidiary JOstatní články
    TitleEffect of forest clearing on the abundance of Ixodes ricinus ticks and the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l
    TitleVliv proklestění lesa na abundanci klíštěte obecného Ixodes ricinus a na prevalenci spirochét Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. v klíšťatech
    Author(s) Hubálek, Zdeněk (UBO-W) RID, SAI, ORCID
    Halouzka, Jiří (UBO-W) SAI
    Juřicová, Zina (UBO-W) RID, SAI
    Šikutová, Silvie (UBO-W) RID, SAI, SAI
    Rudolf, Ivo (UBO-W) RID, ORCID, SAI
    Source TitleMedical and Veterinary Entomology - ISSN 0269-283X
    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2006), s. 166-172
    Number of pages7 s.
    Languageeng - English
    CountryGB - United Kingdom
    KeywordsIxodes ricinus ; Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato ; Lyme borreliosis risk
    Subject RIVFN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology
    R&D ProjectsGA206/03/0726 GA ČR - Czech Science Foundation (CSF)
    CEZAV0Z60930519 - UBO-W (2005-2011)
    DOI10.1111/j.1365-2915.2006.00615.x
    AnnotationHost-seeking Ixodes ricinus were collected on a forest trail completely cleared in winter 2002/03 from shrub and ground vegetation (treated forest, TF), and on a nearby control uncleared forest transect (untreated forest, UF) in South Moravia (Czech Republic) each May in 2003, 2004 and 2005. Nymphal ticks were 3.4 times, 1.9 times and 1.2 times less frequent on TF than on UF in the three respective years, while abundance of adult ticks decreased much more profoundly, 27.2 times, 4.0 times and 2.2 times, respectively. Prevalence of nymphal ticks infected with Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. (12.6% to 20.0%) did not differ significantly between TF and UF during the 3 years. The habitat modification therefore caused a decreased abundance of I. ricinus as well as a declined frequency of infected ticks (and thus indirectly a lower potential risk of human Lyme borreliosis) which lasted, however, only for 2 years.
    WorkplaceInstitute of Vertebrate Biology
    ContactHana Slabáková, slabakova@ivb.cz, Tel.: 543 422 524
    Year of Publishing2007