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Muscle Cell and Tissue : Current Status of Research Field

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    0499717 - FGÚ 2019 RIV GB eng M - Monography Chapter
    Bačáková, Lucie - Trávníčková, Martina - Filová, Elena - Matějka, Roman - Štěpanovská, Jana - Musílková, Jana - Zárubová, Jana - Molitor, M.
    Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs) in Blood Vessel Tissue Engineering: The Use of Differentiated Cells or Stem Cells as VSMC Precursors.
    Muscle Cell and Tissue : Current Status of Research Field. London: IntechOpen, 2018 - (Sakuma, K.), s. 289-308. ISBN 978-1-78984-006-3
    R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33018A; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062
    Institutional support: RVO:67985823
    Keywords : vascular replacement * adipose tissue-derived stem cells * transforming growth factor-beta * bone morphogenetic protein-4 * mechanical loading * dynamic bioreactors * smooth muscle cell differentiation * tissue engineering * regenerative medicine
    OECD category: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the blood vessels. In a healthy adult organism, VSMCs are quiescent, but after a blood vessel injury, they undergo phenotypic modulation from the contractile phenotype to the synthetic phenotype, characterized by high activity in migration, proliferation and proteosynthesis. This behavior of VSMCs can lead to stenosis or obliteration of the vascular lumen. For this reason, VSMCs have tended to be avoided in the construction of blood vessel replacements. However, VSMCs are a physiological and the most numerous component of blood vessels, so their presence in novel advanced vascular replacements is indispensable. Either differentiated VSMCs or stem cells as precursors of VSMCs can be used in the reconstruction of the tunica media in these replacements. VSMCs can be obtained from blood vessels (usually from subcutaneous veins) taken surgically from the patients and can be expanded in vitro. During in vitro cultivation, VSMCs lose their differentiation markers, at least partly. These cells should therefore be re-differentiated by seeding them on appropriate scaffolds by composing cell culture media and by mechanical stimulation in dynamic bioreactors. Similar approaches can also be applied for differentiating stem cells, particularly adipose tissue-derived stem cells, toward VSMCs for the purposes of vascular tissue engineering.
    Permanent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0291944

     
     
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