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Does a minimal intervention approach threaten the biodiversity of protected areas? A multi-taxa short-term response to intervention in temperate oak-dominated forests

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    0448566 - BC 2016 RIV NL eng J - Journal Article
    Šebek, Pavel - Bače, R. - Bartoš, Michael - Beneš, Jiří - Chlumská, Zuzana - Doležal, Jiří - Dvorský, Miroslav - Kovář, J. - Machač, O. - Mikátová, B. - Perlík, Michal - Plátek, Michal - Poláková, Simona - Škorpík, R. - Stejskal, R. - Svoboda, M. - Trnka, F. - Vlašín, M. - Zapletal, Michal - Čížek, Lukáš
    Does a minimal intervention approach threaten the biodiversity of protected areas? A multi-taxa short-term response to intervention in temperate oak-dominated forests.
    Forest Ecology and Management. Roč. 358, Dec 15 (2015), s. 80-89. ISSN 0378-1127. E-ISSN 1872-7042
    R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1952; GA ČR GAP505/10/2167
    Grant - others: GA JU(CZ) 046/2014/P; European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0064; European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0040
    Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67985939
    Keywords : coppice * open woodlands * biodiversity conservation
    Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (BU-J)
    Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2015
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112715004764

    The study was carried out in the oak-dominated forests of Podyji National Park (Czech Republic), an historically managed area left for natural succession since 1950. Twelve experimental clearings were created in closed-canopy forests within the core zone of the park; six of these clearings were connected to forest edges and open meadows, the remaining six clearings were isolated from open habitats within closed forest. To assess the importance of minimal intervention and active management measures in protected forests, we compared the richness and composition of insects, reptiles, birds and vascular plants in the clearings and in four reference habitats, including closed forest, forest edge, open forest, and meadow, in the first season following the intervention. In comparison to closed-canopy forest, the clearings had higher species richness of butterflies, saproxylic and floricolous beetles, reptiles, and vascular plants but lower richness of moths and epigeic beetles, and similar richness of birds. For most groups, the species composition of clearings differed from that of closed forest or even the forest edge, indicating that the latter habitats cannot serve as a sufficient replacements for the conservation of open woodland species. The species richness of isolated clearings was generally lower than that of clearings connected to open habitats, and their communities contained a larger proportion of species associated with closed forest. Most threatened species were associated with clearings or open forest, closed forest and meadow hosted only a few. The creation of the clearings in closed-canopy forests had a positive effect on overall species richness and supported threatened species in most model groups. It is thus a valuable management tool in the conservation of temperate woodland biodiversity. Our results also point to the importance of connectivity of open habitats in wooded landscapes.
    Permanent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0250455

     
     
Number of the records: 1