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Humans and great apes cohabiting the forest ecosystem in Central African Republic harbour the same hookworms

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    0427111 - UBO-W 2015 RIV US eng J - Journal Article
    Hasegawa, H. - Modrý, D. - Kitagawa, M. - Shutt, K. A. - Todd, A. - Kalousová, B. - Profousová, I. - Petrželková, Klára Judita
    Humans and great apes cohabiting the forest ecosystem in Central African Republic harbour the same hookworms.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Roč. 8, č. 3 (2014), e2715. ISSN 1935-2735
    R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927
    Institutional support: RVO:68081766
    Keywords : Necator spp. * mountain gorillas * infection * chimpanzees * Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic
    Subject RIV: EG - Zoology
    Impact factor: 4.446, year: 2014

    We conducted analyses of DNA sequences obtained from the infective larvae of Necator spp. from humans and great apes inhabiting Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic. Three sequence types (I–III) were recognized in the in the ITS region, and 34 cox1 haplotypes represented three phylogenetic groups (A–C). I-A, II-B, II-C, III-B, III-C combinations were determined. Combination I-A, corresponding to Necator americanus, was demonstrated in humans and western lowland gorillas; II-B and II-C were observed in humans (local inhabitants and researchers), western lowland gorillas and chimpanzees; III-B and III-C were found only in humans. Pairwise nucleotide difference in the cox1 haplotypes between the groups was more than 8%, while the difference within each group was less than 2.1%, suggesting that each type represents a distinct species. This is the first molecular evidence that Necator species found in great apes can infect humans and vice versa.
    Permanent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0232722
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