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Effect of extra-pair paternity and parental quality on brood sex ratio in the scarlet rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus

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    0383938 - UBO-W 2013 RIV CZ eng J - Journal Article
    Poláková, Radka - Schnitzer, J. - Vinkler, Michal - Bryja, Josef - Munclinger, P. - Albrecht, Tomáš
    Effect of extra-pair paternity and parental quality on brood sex ratio in the scarlet rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus.
    Folia zoologica. Roč. 61, 3-4 (2012), s. 225-232. ISSN 0139-7893
    R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GA206/06/0851
    Institutional support: RVO:68081766
    Keywords : sex allocation * extra-pair mating * parental attractiveness
    Subject RIV: EG - Zoology
    Impact factor: 0.494, year: 2012

    The attractiveness hypothesis predicts that females should bias the sex ratio of their offspring towards sons when mated to attractive males. Females of many socially monogamous bird species commonly engage in extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs). Assuming that extra-pair males are more attractive to females than their social partners, and that sons inherit superior traits from their fathers, extra-pair young should be more likely males. According to the maternal condition hypothesis male-biased sex ratio in offspring should be also associated with better female body condition. We evaluated these ideas in the scarlet rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus), socially monogamous songbird with moderate level of extra-pair fertilizations. Contrary to the attractiveness hypothesis we have found no significant effect of paternity (within-pair or extra-pair) on the sex of individual offspring. Furthermore, data did not suggest that females mated to males with more elaborated plumage colour were more likely to produce sons. However, consistently with the maternal condition hypothesis, high-quality females produced more sons than daughters. Our results indicate that scarlet rosefinch females may not be able to manipulate the primary sex ratio of their offspring in relation to the attractiveness of their mate, but they may adjust it according to their own condition.
    Permanent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0213723
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