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beta-aminobutyric acid protects Brassica napus plants from infection by Leptosphaeria maculans. Resistance induction or a direct antifungal effect?

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    0382522 - UEB-Q 2013 RIV NL eng J - Journal Article
    Šašek, Vladimír - Nováková, Miroslava - Dobrev, Petre - Valentová, O. - Burketová, Lenka
    beta-aminobutyric acid protects Brassica napus plants from infection by Leptosphaeria maculans. Resistance induction or a direct antifungal effect?
    European journal of plant pathology. Roč. 133, č. 1 (2012), s. 279-289. ISSN 0929-1873
    R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/08/1581; GA MZe QH72117
    Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511
    Keywords : Antimicrobial * BTH * Gene expression
    Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection
    Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2012

    Resistance to infection in plants can be induced by treatment with various chemicals. One such compound is beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA). Its positive effect on disease resistance has been noted in several pathosystems. Here we demonstrate that treatment with BABA protects Brassica napus plants from infection by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Surprisingly, BABA also displayes in vitro antifungal activity against L. maculans with EC50 similar to the fungicide tebuconazole. Both spore germination and hyphal growth were affected. The toxic effect can be reverted by addition of trypton to the culture medium. We hypothesised that BABA might inhibit inorganic nitrogen assimilation. Suppression of disease progression in plants and antifungal activity in vitro was weaker for alpha-aminobutyric acid and negligible for gamma-aminobutyric acid. In contrast to a resistance inducer benzothiadiazole, the effect of BABA on disease development was nearly independent of the timing of treatment, indicating possible antifungal activity in planta. On the other hand, quantification of multiple hormones and an expression analysis have shown that treatment with BABA induces a synthesis of salicylic acid (SA) and expression of SA marker gene PR-1, but no evidence was observed for priming of SA responses to L. maculans. While we have not conclusively demonstrated how BABA suppresses the disease progression, our results do indicate that antifungal activity is another mechanism by which BABA can protect plants from infection.
    Permanent Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0212722
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