Počet záznamů: 1  

The phylogeny of the African wood mice (Muridae, Hylomyscus) based on complete mitochondrial genomes and five nuclear genes reveals their evolutionary history and undescribed diversity

  1. 1.
    0520653 - ÚBO 2021 RIV US eng J - Článek v odborném periodiku
    Nicolas, V. - Fabre, P.-H. - Bryja, Josef - Denys, C. - Verheyen, E. - Missoup, A. D. - Olayemi, A. - Katuala, P. - Dudu, A. - Colyn, M. - Kerbis Peterhans, J. C. - Demos, T.
    The phylogeny of the African wood mice (Muridae, Hylomyscus) based on complete mitochondrial genomes and five nuclear genes reveals their evolutionary history and undescribed diversity.
    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Roč. 144, MAR (2020), č. článku 106703. ISSN 1055-7903
    Grant CEP: GA ČR GAP506/10/0983; GA ČR GA15-20229S
    Institucionální podpora: RVO:68081766
    Klíčová slova: Biogeography * Mammals * Rodents * Speciation * Taxonomy * Tropical Africa
    Impakt faktor: 3.992, rok: 2018
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790319305366?via%3Dihub

    Wood mice of the genus Hylomyscus, are small-sized rodents widely distributed in lowland and montane rainforests in tropical Africa, where they can be locally abundant. Recent morphological and molecular studies have increased the number of recognized species from 8 to 18 during the last 15 years. We used complete mitochondrial genomes and five nuclear genes to infer the number of candidate species within this genus and depict its evolutionary history. In terms of gene sampling and geographical and taxonomic coverage, this is the most comprehensive review of the genus Hylomyscus to date. The six species groups (aeta, alleni, anselli, baeri, denniae and parvus) defined on morphological grounds are monophyletic. Species delimitation analyses highlight undescribed diversity within this genus: perhaps up to 10 taxa need description or elevation from synonymy, pending review of type specimens. Our divergence dating and biogeographical analyses show that diversification of the genus occurred after the end of the Miocene and is closely linked to the history of the African forest. The formation of the Rift Valley combined with the declining global temperatures during the Late Miocene caused the fragmentation of the forests and explains the first split between the denniae group and remaining lineages. Subsequently, periods of increased climatic instability during Plio-Pleistocene probably resulted in elevated diversification in both lowland and montane forest taxa.
    Trvalý link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0305290