Počet záznamů: 1  

Transient inactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex in rats disrupts avoidance of a dynamic object

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    0485342 - FGÚ 2018 RIV US eng J - Článek v odborném periodiku
    Svoboda, Jan - Lobellová, Veronika - Popelíková, Anna - Ahuja, Nikhil - Kelemen, Eduard - Stuchlík, Aleš
    Transient inactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex in rats disrupts avoidance of a dynamic object.
    Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. Roč. 139, Mar 2017 (2017), s. 144-148. ISSN 1074-7427. E-ISSN 1095-9564
    Grant CEP: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03627S; GA MŠMT(CZ) LH14053
    Institucionální podpora: RVO:67985823
    Klíčová slova: enemy avoidance * moving goal * navigation * avoidance * rat * robot
    Obor OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology
    Impakt faktor: 3.244, rok: 2017

    Although animals often learn and monitor the spatial properties of relevant moving objects such as con specifics and predators to properly organize their own spatial behavior, the underlying brain substrate has received little attention and hence remains elusive. Because the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) participates in conflict monitoring and effort-based decision making, and ACC neurons respond to objects in the environment, it may also play a role in the monitoring of moving cues and exerting the appropriate spatial response. We used a robot avoidance task in which a rat had to maintain at least a 25 cm distance from a small programmable robot to avoid a foot shock. In successive sessions, we trained ten Long Evans male rats to avoid a fast-moving robot (4 cm/s), a stationary robot, and a slow-moving robot (1 cm/s). In each condition, the ACC was transiently inactivated by bilateral injections of muscimol in the penultimate session and a control saline injection was given in the last session. Compared to the corresponding saline session, ACC-inactivated rats received more shocks when tested in the fast-moving condition, but not in the stationary or slow robot conditions. Furthermore, ACC-inactivated rats less frequently responded to an approaching robot with appropriate escape responses although their response to shock stimuli remained preserved. Since we observed no effect on slow or stationary robot avoidance, we conclude that the ACC may exert cognitive efforts for monitoring dynamic updating of the position of an object, a role complementary to the dorsal hippocampus.
    Trvalý link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0280401

     
     
Počet záznamů: 1  

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