Počet záznamů: 1  

The isotopic composition of soil organic carbon on a north - south transect in western Canada

  1. 1. 0206534 - UPB-H 20033073 RIV GB eng J - Článek v odborném periodiku
    Bird, M. - Šantrůčková, Hana - Lloyd, J. - Lawson, E.
    The isotopic composition of soil organic carbon on a north - south transect in western Canada.
    European Journal of Soil Science. Roč. 53, - (2002), s. 393-403. ISSN 1351-0754
    Výzkumný záměr: CEZ:AV0Z6066911
    Klíčová slova: isotopic composition * soil organic carbon * western Canada
    Kód oboru RIV: EH - Ekologie - společenstva
    Impakt faktor: 1.452, rok: 2002

    The minor isotopes of carbon (13C and 14C) are widely used as tracers in studies of the global carbon cycle. We present carbon-isotope data for the 0-5 cm layer of soil on a transect from 49,6 degN to 68 degN, from mature forest and tundra ecosystems in the boreal-arctic zone of interior western Canada. Soil organic carbon in the <2000 microm fraction of the soil decreases from 3,14 kg.m-2 in the south to 1,31 kg.m-2 in the north. The 14C activity of the organic carbon decreases as latitude increases from 118,9 to 100,7 per cent modern carbon (pMC). In addition, the 14C activities of organic carbon in the particle-size fractions of each sample decrease as particle size decreases. These results suggest that organic carbon in the 0-5 cm layer of these soils transfers from standing biomass into the coarsest size fractions of the soil and is then degraded over time, with the residue progressively transferred into the more resistant finer particle sizes. We calculate residence times for the coarsest size fractions of 21 years in the south to 71 years in the north. Residence time for the fine size fractions (<63 microm) are considerably longer, ranging from 90 years in the south to 960 years in the north. The d13C of the organic carbon decreases from -26,8 +/- prom. 0,3 prom in soil under forest in the south to -26,2 +/- 0,1prom for tundra sites in the north. At all sites there is an increase in d13C with decreasing particle size of 0,7-1,6 promile. These changes in d13C are due to the presence of "old" carbon in equilibrium with an atmosphere richer in 13C, and to the effects of microbial degradation.
    Trvalý link: http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0102126